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The printer’s widow

The printer’s widow: gender, family and editorial choices in early modern Antwerp, Louvain, and Douai (long 16th – 17th centuries)

PhD-Researcher: Heleen Wyffels

Promotor: V. Soen, J. Verberckmoes

In the early modern Low Countries, a woman could only become the head of a printing house by surviving a man. Widows (and sometimes daughters) appear with startling regularity in colophons and other sources pertaining to the business of their deceased husbands (or fathers) and were regarded as their legitimate successors. Surprisingly, book historians often gloss over the presence of these women in their sources. Therefore, this PhD-project aims to shed more light on widow-printer’s contribution to their family business and the book trade as a whole by combining a book historical approach with family and social history. It will consider widow-printers in Antwerp, a commercial metropolis in the Spanish-Habsburg sphere of influence and in Louvain and Douai, two university cities. The latter was a border region that attracted religious exiles from the British Isles, France and northern regions of the Low Countries. Due to the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (1668), it came under French rule after intense warfare, while Antwerp re-oriented itself to a firmly Catholic identity after its siege (1584-1585) during the Dutch Revolt. These developments impacted the three book towns profoundly and by comparing them during the long sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the project will chart how widow-printers navigated their transregional contexts.

Johan Verberckmoes

Prof. Dr. Johan Verberckmoes

Johan Verberckmoes (°1962) is since 1985 member of the Research Unit Early Modern History, first as assistant and since 1996 as full-time professor. He studied history at the University of Leuven and the University of Hull (United Kingdom). In 1993 he graduated with a doctorate on humor and laughter in the 16th and 17th centuries, which forms one of his research specialisations. Other topics which he investigates are the imagination of overseas cultures in the Iberian Empires, private correspondences, emotions and family life, culture and social relations in the Early Modern city. He currently teaches (amongst others) British History, Cultural History of the Early Modern period, and The History of Portuguese America.

Recent publications:

C. Goossens  en J. Verberckmoes, Broze levens, krachtige vrouwen: Zussen, moeders en tantes Goubau in de achttiende eeuw, Leuven, 2017.

W. Thomas and J. Verberckmoes, ‘The Southern Netherlands as a Centre of Global Knowledge Concerning the Iberian Empires in the Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Centuries’, in  S. Dupré, B. Demunck, W. Thomas, G. Vanpaemel (eds.), Embattled Territory. The Circulation of Knowledge in the Spanish Netherlands, Gent, 2015, 161-197.

V. Soen, A. Soetaert, and J. Verberckmoes, ‘Verborgen meertaligheid. De katholieke drukpers in de kerkprovincie Kamerijk (1560-1600)’, in: Queeste: tijdschrift voor middeleeuwse letterkunde in de Nederlanden, 22:1 (2015), 62-81.

J. Verberckmoes, ‘How Dutch Brasil Affects Your Emotions: The Antwerp Jesuit Cornelius Hazart On Early Colonial Brasil ‘, in: M. Van Groesen (ed.), The Legacy of Dutch Brasil, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2014, p.146-167.

J. Verberckmoes, ‘Parading hilarious exotics in the Spanish Netherlands’, in: Nederlands kunsthistorisch jaarboek, 53 (2003), 53-69.

Contact details:

E-mail: johan.verberckmoes@kuleuven.be

Adress: KU Leuven, Onderzoeksgroep Nieuwe Tijd, Blijde Inkomststraat 21 bus 3307, B-3000 Leuven.

 

Jane Foto

Dr. Jane Judge

Jane Judge received her PhD in History from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in June 2015. She wrote her doctoral thesis on the history of the United States of Belgium and its place within the wider Age of Revolutions, with the assistance of a fellowship at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow of the Belgian American Educational Foundation working with the Early Modern History group of KU Leuven in Belgium. Currently she is researching public manifestations of Belgianness during the 18th-century revolution, with an eye to incorporating the movement of revolution, revolutionaries, ideologies across borders. She is also transforming her doctoral thesis into a book to be published by Leuven University Press.

Recent publications:

J. Judge, ‘An Age in Microcosm: the United States of Belgium,’ in: B. Marsh and M. Rapport (eds.), Understanding and Teaching the Age of Revolutions, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2017, forthcoming.

J. Judge, ‘Provincial Manifestes: Belgians Declare Independence, 1789-1790′, in De Achttiende Eeuw, forthcoming.

J. Judge, ‘The Scottish-American Enlightenment’, in J. Straub (ed.), Handbook of Transatlantic North American Studies, Berlin,New York: De Gruyter, 2016, 545-561.

J. Judge, ‘Qu’allons-nous devenir? Belgian National Identity in the Age of Revolution’, in L. Jensen (ed.), The Roots of Nationalism. National Identity Formation in Early Modern Europe, 1600-1815, (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2016, 291-307.

J. Judge, ‘The End! Finishing Up Your Thesis’, Blog post for Laura Harrison, Editor-in-Chief, Pubs and Publications, The PhD Experience, University of Edinburgh School of History, Classics, and Archaeology PhD Student Blog, 24 April 2015 [http://www.blogs.hss.ed.ac.uk/pubs-and-publications/2015/04/24/the-end-finishing-up-your-thesis/]

J. Judge and E.M. Angelini, ‘Le Général Charles de Gaulle et l’Algérie’, American Association of Teachers of French, National Bulletin, 33.1 (2007), 39-42 and Vol. 33.2 (2007), 32-36.

Contact details:

E-mail: jane.judge@arts.kuleuven.be

Adress: KU Leuven, Onderzoeksgroep Nieuwe Tijd, Blijde Inkomststraat 21 bus 3307, B-3000 Leuven.

 

 

De Klerk

Overview of Recent Publications

Avisos de Flandes

The Research Group Early Modern History directs under the supervision of Werner Thomas the series Avisos de Flandes at Leuven University Press. This series focuses on transregional and intercultural exchanges in the Habsburg Empire and beyond. http://upers.kuleuven.be/en/avisos-de-flandes

Habsburg Worlds

Professor Soen is general editor of the series Habsburg Worlds by Brepols Publishers. This series covers the vast conglomerates under the rule of Spanish and Austrian members of the Habsburg dynasty. The series focuses on the daily experiences, social networks, trade routes, religious motivations, legal traditions, intellectual currents and political cultures in these regions. It aims to foster an interdisciplinary and comparative approach necessary for studying the manifold languages, cultures, histories and traditions in Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia once under Habsburg administration or overlordship.

Publications by the Research Team:

E. De Bom, R. Lesaffer and W.Thomas (eds.), Early Modern Sovereignties. Theory and Practice of a Burgeoning Concept in the Netherlands, Brill, forthcoming.

C. Goossens  en J. Verberckmoes, Broze levens, krachtige vrouwen: Zussen, moeders en tantes Goubau in de achttiende eeuw, Leuven, forthcoming.

V. Soen and L. Hollevoet, ‘Le Borromée des anciens Pays-Bas? Maximilien de Berghes, (arch)évêque de Cambrai et l’application du Concile de Trente (1564-1567)’, Revue du Nord, forthcoming.

V. Soen and A. Van de Meulebroucke, ‘Vanguard Tridentine Reform in the Habsburg Netherlands The episcopacy of Robert de Croÿ, bishop of Cambrai 1519-1556)’ in: V. Soen, D. Vanysacker and W. François (ed.), Church, Censorship and Reform in the early modern Habsburg Netherlands (Bibliothèque de la Revue d’histoire ecclésiastique 101), Turnhout, forthcoming.

W. Thomas, ‘The metamorphosis of the Spanish Inquisition, 1520-1648′, in: D. Prudlo (ed.), A Companion to Heresy Inquisitions, Brill, forthcoming.

W. Thomas, ‘Inquisition and repression of Protestantism in Spain’, in: M.Ortrud Hertrampf (ed.), The Reformation in Spain, Peter Lang, forthcoming.

W. Thomas, ‘Printing for the Empire: books from the Habsburg Netherlands in Spanish America, 1500-1700′, in: Quaerendo, forthcoming.

 

V. Soen, B. De Ridder, A. Soetaert, W. Thomas, J. Verberckmoes, S. Verreyken, How to do Transregional History: a Concept, Method and Tool for Early Modern Border Research, in: Journal of Early Modern History, 21 (2017).

 

A Soetaert, Une Espèce de Déluge dans la Ville… Inondations Urbaines à Namur aux Temps Modernes, Namur, 2016. Link to Book

A. Soetaert, ‘Printing at the frontier. The emergence of a transregional book production in the Ecclesiastical Province of Cambrai (ca. 1560-1659)’, in: De Gulden Passer: Journal for book history, 94 (2016), 137-163. Link to article

B. De Ridder, ‘Early Modern Peace and International Society: Using Disciplinary Hybridity to Question the Pax Hispanica (1598-1618)’, in: The International History Review, published online (2016). Link to article

B. De Ridder,‘Benchmarking the Past: Politico-Legal Connotations of Tradition, Custom and Common Practice in the Diplomacy of the Eighty Years War’, in: Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, published online (2016). Link to article

B. De Ridder, ‘Sustaining the Munster Peace: The Chambre Mi-Partie as an Experiment in Transnational Border Arbitration (1648-1675)’, in: Journal of Modern European History, 14.1 (2016), 35-53. Link to article

V. Soen, ‘Exile encounters and cross-border mobility in early modern borderlands: the Ecclesiastical Province of Cambrai as a transregional node (1559-1600)’, in: Belgeo : Revue Belge de Geographie / Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Geografie / Belgische Zeitschrift für Geographie = Belgian Journal of Geography, 2015, 2 (2016), 2-13. Link to article

V. Soen, ‘La nobleza y la frontera entre los Países Bajos y Francia: las casas nobiliarias Croÿ, Lalaing y Berlaymont en la segunda mitad del siglo XVI’, in: M. Merluzzi and G. Sabatini, Fronteras. Representaciónes, integraciónes y conflictos entre Europa y America, s. XVI-XX, Rome (2016).

 

V. Soen, ‘The Chièvres Legacy, the Croÿ Family and Litigation in Paris. Dynastic Identities between the Low Countries and France (1519-1559)’, in: L. Geevers and M. Marini (eds.), Dynastic Identity in Early Modern Europe: Rulers, Aristocrats and the Formation of Identities (Politics and Culture in Europe, 1650-1750), Ashgate, Farnham, 2015, 87-102. Link to article

V. Soen, A. Soetaert, and J. Verberckmoes, ‘Verborgen meertaligheid. De katholieke drukpers in de kerkprovincie Kamerijk (1560-1600)’, in: Queeste: tijdschrift voor middeleeuwse letterkunde in de Nederlanden, 22:1 (2015), 62-81.

A. Soetaert, ‘Translating and distributing Italian religious literature in the ecclesiastical province of Cambrai (1563-1659)’, in: Incontri: Rivista Europea di Studi Italiani, 22:2 (2015), 29-40. Link to article

S. Dupré, B. Demunck, W. Thomas, G. Vanpaemel (eds.), Embattled Territory. The Circulation of Knowledge in the Spanish Netherlands, Ghent, 2015.

W. Thomas and J. Verberckmoes, ‘The Southern Netherlands as a Centre of Global Knowledge Concerning the Iberian Empires in the Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Centuries’, in  S. Dupré, B. Demunck, W. Thomas, G. Vanpaemel (eds.), Embattled Territory. The Circulation of Knowledge in the Spanish Netherlands, Ghent, 2015, 161-197.

 

B. De Ridder, ‘Rusland, de Krim en het hernieuwde belang van territoriale claims’, in: Internationale Spectator: Tijdschrift voor Internationale Politiek, 68:10 (2014), 37-41.

B. De Ridder and V. Soen, ‘The Act of Cession, the 1598 and 1600 States-Generals in Brussels and the peace negotiations during the Dutch Revolt’, in: R. Lesaffer (ed.), The Twelve Years Truce (1609): Peace, Truce, War and Law in the Low Countries at the Turn of the 17th Century (Studies in the History of International Law, 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill/Nijhoff, 2014, 48-68.

B. De Ridder and T. Vermeersch, ‘Grensstudies in de Zwinstreek. De studie en ontsluiting van een historisch grensland’, in: Tijd-Schrift. Heemkunde en lokaal-erfgoedpraktijk in Vlaanderen, 4.1 (2014), 60-74.

V. Soen, Y. Junot en F. Mariage (eds.), L’identité au pluriel. Jeux et enjeux des appartenances autour des anciens Pays-Bas, XIVe-XVIIIe siècles / Identity and Identities. Belonging at stake in and around the Low Countries, 14th-18th centuries (Revue du Nord, Hors série, Collection Histoire 30), Villeneuve d’Ascq, 2014.

V. Soen and H. Cools, ‘L’aristocratie transrégionale et les frontières. Les processus d’identification politique dans les maisons de Luxembourg-Saint-Pol et de Croÿ (1470-1530)’, in: V. Soen, Y. Junot en F. Mariage (eds.), L’identité au pluriel. Jeux et enjeux des appartenances autour des anciens Pays-Bas, XIVe-XVIIIe siècles / Identity and Identities. Belonging at stake in and around the Low Countries, 14th-18th centuries (Revue du Nord, Hors série, Collection Histoire 30), Villeneuve d’Ascq, 2014, 209-228.

W. Thomas, ‘The Treaty of London, the Twelve Years Truce and Religious Toleration in Spain and the Netherlands (1598-1621), in: R. Lesaffer (ed.), The Twelve Years Truce (1609): Peace, Truce, War and Law in the Low Countries at the Turn of the 17th Century (Studies in the History of International Law, 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill/Nijhoff, 2014, 277-297.

J. Verberckmoes, ‘How Dutch Brasil Affects Your Emotions: The Antwerp Jesuit Cornelius Hazart On Early Colonial Brasil ‘, in: M. Van Groesen (ed.), The Legacy of Dutch Brasil, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2014, p.146-167.

S. Verreyken, ‘Tijd om te herbronnen. De impact van beeldvorming op de stedelijke groei van Spa in de zeventiende eeuw’, in: Stadsgeschiedenis 2 (2014), 113-129.

 

B. De Ridder, ‘Frans-Vlaanderen als grensland tussen het koninkrijk Frankrijk en het graafschap Vlaanderen’, Romaneske, 38 (2013), 2-9.

A. Soetaert, ‘“Pour servir de mémoire à la postérité.” Herinneringscultuur en overstromingen in het vroegmoderne Namen.’, in: Tijdschrift voor Waterstaatsgeschiedenis, 22 (2013), 45–56.

A. Soetaert and B. Vannieuwenhuyze, ‘Middeleeuws Namen aan Samber en/of Maas. Beeldvorming en vooringenomenheid in stadstopografisch onderzoek’, in: Stadsgeschiedenis, 8 (2013), 1–18.

W. Thomas, ‘De Zwarte Legende voorbij. Spanje, de Zuidelijke Nederlanden en de eerste globalisering, 1500-1700′, in: Academiae Analecta. Mededelingen van de Koninklijke Vlaamse Academie van België voor Wetenschappen en Kunsten, 20 (2013), 3-20.

 

B. De Ridder, ‘De Akte van Afstand als pacificatiestrategie tijdens de Nederlandse Opstand (1597-1600)’, in: Handelingen van de Koninklijke Zuid-Nederlandse Maatschappij voor Taal-, Letterkunde en Geschiedenis, 65 (2012), 209-221.

V. Soen, ‘La Causa Croÿ et les limites du mythe bourguignon: la frontière, le lignage et la mémoire (1465-1475)’ in: J.-M. Cauchies and P. Peporte (eds.), Mémoires conflictuelles et mythes concurrents dans les pays bourguignons (ca. 1380-1580) (Publications du Centre d’études bourguignonnes XIVe-XVIe s. 52), Neuchâtel, 2012, 81-97.

 

V. Soen, ‘Naturales del país o Espaignolizés? Agentes de la Corte como negociadores de paz durante la guerra de Flandes (1577-1595)’ in: R. Vermeir, M. Ebben and R. Fagel (eds.), Agentes y Identidades en movimiento. España y los Países Bajos, siglos XVI-XVIII, Madrid, 2011, 171-193.

 

J. Verberckmoes, ‘Parading hilarious exotics in the Spanish Netherlands’, in: Nederlands kunsthistorisch jaarboek, 53 (2003), 53-69.

Colleges of Douai

Printing at the Frontier

A. Soetaert, ‘Printing at the frontier. The emergence of a transregional book production in the Ecclesiastical Province of Cambrai (ca. 1560-1659)’, in: De Gulden Passer: Journal for book history, 94 (2016), 137-163.

In 1559 most of the French-speaking provinces in the south of the Habsburg Low Countries were united in the new Ecclesiastical Province of Cambrai. Establishing enduring and prolific printing businesses in this region had proved an extremely difficult task ever since the start of the 16th century. Several booksellers were active in many towns of the Cambrai province, but a local book production did not come off the ground due to a combination of warfare and the dominance of major and nearby typographic centres (most notably Paris and Antwerp). Yet, from about 1590 new printers settled in the province, leading to a significant increase of the book production. This article argues that, besides the context of tense peace and the relative regression of the Antwerp and Paris production, also the emergence of a transregional book production in the region itself should be taken into account in explaining this golden age of printing in the early 17th century. It appears that in these years, the local book world could finally take advantage of the previously judged detrimental position in between Europe’s major typographic centres. Two case studies will explore how the location at several political, linguistic and cultural borders at once, contributed to the flourishing of the region’s book world. A first part of the article focusses on the strategy of massively and systematically reprinting books originally issued in France in this part of the Habsburg Low Countries. Subsequently, the hundreds of English editions that came off the province’s presses and that were intended for British Catholic communities still living in the British Isles are also considered a factor contributing to the golden age of printing in Cambrai.

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Sustaining the Munster Peace

B. De Ridder, ‘Sustaining the Munster Peace: The Chambre Mi-Partie as an Experiment in Transnational Border Arbitration (1648-1675), in: Journal of Modern European History (1), 35-53.

Abstract:

With the end of the Eighty Years War in the Low Countries, the Spanish-Habsburg monarchy and the Dutch Republic needed to transform their war-torn frontier into a peaceful international border. The 1648 Peace of Munster therefore decreed that a Chambre Mi-Partie would be created, a court of arbitration intended to settle the remaining territorial issues and to resolve all peace-related conflicts between the Habsburg Netherlands and the United Provinces. This article argues that, in contrast to many other early modern attempts at arbitration, the court functioned relatively well and demonstrates how a transnational organisation could aid the peaceful maintenance of a new border. One of the main reasons that the Chambre Mi-Partie managed to assume this role was its structure as a transnational legal institution. Being composed of eight judges from each country – men who worked well together and took their neutrality seriously –, the court bridged the new divide. The court served as an important alternative to diplomatic conflict resolution and ensured that the numerous small border conflicts of the post-war period did not spill over into renewed violence

Link to text via publisher: http://elibrary.chbeck.de/10.17104/1611-8944-2016-1-35/sustaining-the-munster-peace-the-chambre-mi-partie-as-an-experiment-in-transnational-border-arbitration-1648-1675-jahrgang-14-2016-heft-1

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Early Modern Peace

B. De Ridder, ‘Early Modern Peace and International Society: Using Disciplinary Hybridity to Question the Pax Hispanica (1598-1618)’, in: The International History Review, online publication (2016).

Abstract:

Between the academic fields of International Relations and History there currently exist few real crossovers, despite the fact that both disciplines would benefit from an improved working relationship. As this is especially the case with regard to the pre-modern past, this article offers a new perspective on the possibilities of increased interaction in the field of Early Modern peace-making. Rather than setting up an abstract debate on how the different methodologies of IR and History might be combined, the text provides a hands-on example of how such disciplinary hybridity could work. By analysing the specific historical case of the 1598–1618 Pax Hispanica through the analytical lens of Hedley Bull’s International Society, it is highlighted what can be gained from such an experiment. By taking several steps that fuse the key elements of historical and IR research – including the contextualisation of Bull’s theory, the categorisation of historical structures, and the re-assessment of the actual peace treaties – new elements about the occurrence of the Pax Hispanica and the mechanics of International Society are revealed. Nevertheless, these results form only a starting point for further discussion about the value of such increased interdisciplinary research.

Link to text via publisher: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07075332.2016.1189953

 

embattled_territory

Embattled Territory

S. Dupré, B. Demunck, W. Thomas, G. Vanpaemel (eds.), Embattled Territory. The Circulation of Knowledge in the Spanish Netherlands, Ghent, 2015.

Abstract

The classical view of science in the Spanish Netherlands harbours implicit assumptions which need to be reconsidered in the light of contemporary historiography. Approaching the history of science from the perspective of the circulation of knowledge, this book indicates new paths of research furthering the integration of the history of science into wider, general history. To accomplish this aim the book raises three sets of questions. The first question concerns the role of cities in the production and transmission of knowledgde and skills in the Spanish Netherlands, with the Southern Netherlands being home to one of the densest urban networks in the world. In a second step, the book discusses how the Southern Netherlands were entangled with the rest of the globe through the Spanish Empire, and the Atlantic world in particular. How did these Iberian connections shape the circulation of knowledge in the Spanish Netherlands? Thirdly, did the definition and nature of knowledge change in the Spanish Netherlands and how was this related to processes of political and religious transformation. Focussing on urban knowledge, Iberian connections and the politics of knowledge, this book offers a new framework for the history of science in the Spanish Netherlands.

With contributions of Sven Dupré, Geert Vanpaemel, Raoul De Kerf, Bert De Munck, Annelies De Bie, Pieter Martens, Dirk Van de Vijver, Vincent Van Roy, Johan Verberckmoes, Werner Thomas, Florike Egmond, Piet Lombaerde, Arjan Van Dixhoorn, Ralph Dekoninck, Agnès Guiderdoni, Krista De Jonge, Maarten Delbeke, Christina Göttler, and Tine Meganck.

Link to publisher: http://www.academiapress.be/embattled-territory.html

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Benchmarking the Past

B. De Ridder, ‘Benchmarking the Past: Politico-Legal Connotations of Tradition, Custom and Common Practice in the Diplomacy of the Eighty Years War’, in: Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies, published online (2016).

Abstract

In the historiography of the Dutch Revolt and the Eighty Years War, scholars have focused principally on the growing differences between the Habsburg Netherlands and the Dutch Republic. In order to explain the eventual separation of the ‘two’ Netherlands, it has been established that the political culture of both countries increasingly grew apart and so prevented reunification. Still, this did not mean that the diplomatic vocabulary of these states no longer contained any similarities. Throughout the Eighty Years War both governments relied on analogous notions of tradition, custom and common practice to legitimize their point of view. Such notions, together with their negative counterpart of innovation, were enshrined in a juridical language that also offered a point of convergence. In turn, these shared claims to history provided a common repertoire that diplomats from both sides deployed in their arguments. As such, benchmarking the past offered a communal framework from which to start and maintain conversation between the separated Netherlands.

Link to text via publisher: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03096564.2016.1143285#.Vx8hqk1f1Ms

 

 

logo red columnaria

XIIth International Conference on the History of the Iberic Monarchies

To reconcile and to reincorporate: Discourse, ceremonies & practices in and beyond the Iberic Monarchies

Réconcilier et réincorporer: Discours, cérémonies et pratiques dans et autour des monarchies ibériques

Reconciliación y reincorporación: Discursos, ceremonias y practicas en las Monarquías Ibéricas

 

Valenciennes/Kortrijk, 24-26 November 2016

Schedule: Programme XII Jornadas

 

In recent years historiography has been slowly acknowledging the potential of civil societies to restore concord after profound divisions. It also has uncovered the pacification strategies of authorities to reconcile and reincorporate individuals and social groups after periods of contestation and revolt. These complex processes are crucial to better understand the history of the Iberic monarchies, which have been able to develop a long-term government despite many crises of different origin and outlook.

Hence, this conference will be focused on the themes of reconciliation and reincorporation from following four perspectives, inviting papers on the subjects listed below:

Words, discourses and emotions: semantics and sentiments

The restauration of civil concord and the obedience to the ruler was shaped by different words and discourses, which on their turn, became connoted with a wide range of emotions. This panel aims to unravel semantics and sentiments behind early modern reconciliation and reincorporation.

Negotiating reconciliation: promotors and strategies

If reconciliation is often perceived as a process emanating from early modern rulers, in practice it is more often negotiated by many other actors, such as local institutions, local elites, governmental bodies etc. What were their formal and informal strategies to pursue peace and concord?

Making reconciliation work: agents and mediators, processes and forms

Peace-making implied more than just signing a treaty, often a long pacification process aimed to put into effect the clauses and to spur the recently concluded reconciliation through the means of ceremonies, festivities, visual representations etc. Again, agents and mediators were necessary to spread and enact the peace message in the societies of the Ancient Regime.

In the margin of reconciliations: the undecided and excluded

If reconciliation parted on a federative discourse, it excluded formally or informally individuals, or it risked hostile reactions and vetoes from opponents. Rather than presenting reconciliation as a fact, as done by the stakeholders involved, this panel will define early modern reconciliation as an open-ended process with an always uncertain and unstable outcome.

 

The conference volume published by Brepols Publishers in the new series Habsburg Worlds will be in English and French. During the conference one can also present in Spanish, Italian and Dutch.

 

Organisation committee :

Yves Junot (Université de Valenciennes) and Violet Soen (KU Leuven)

Coordinators of the nodo Borgonña-Flandes of Red Columnaria

Academic committee:

Tamar Herzog (Harvard University), Marie-Laure Legay (Université Lille3), Guido Marnef (Universiteit Antwerpen), José Javier Ruiz Ibáñez (Universidad de Murcia), Gaetano Sabatini (Università degli Studi Roma Tre), Werner Thomas (KU Leuven), René Vermeir (Universiteit Gent)

Leuven

Valenciennes